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  1. HPV type distribution by cytological status represents useful information to predict the impact of mass vaccination on screening programs.

    Authors: Paolo Giorgi Rossi, Francesco Chini, Simonetta Bisanzi, Elena Burroni, Giuseppe Carillo, Amedeo Lattanzi, Claudio Angeloni, Aurora Scalisi, Rosalba Macis, Maria T Pini, Paola Capparucci, Gabriella Guasticchi and Francesca M Carozzi
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2011 6:2
  2. Human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 type-specific oncogenes are required for cervical carcinogenesis. Current PCR protocols for genotyping high-risk HPV in cervical screening are not standardized and usually use con...

    Authors: Michael Dictor and Janina Warenholt
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2011 6:1
  3. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is found in 10% of all gastric adenocarcinomas but its role in tumor development and maintenance remains unclear. The objective of this study was to examine EBV-mediated dysregulation ...

    Authors: Julie L Ryan, Richard J Jones, Shannon C Kenney, Ashley G Rivenbark, Weihua Tang, Elizabeth RW Knight, William B Coleman and Margaret L Gulley
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5:27
  4. Knowledge of the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes among women with cervical lesion and in invasive cervical cancer is crucial to guide the introduction of prophylactic vaccines. There is no...

    Authors: Magdi M Salih, Mohamed El Safi, Keith Hart, Khater Tobi and Ishag Adam
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5:26
  5. Previous studies have either investigated the relationship of HPV with oral cancer or the prevalence of HPV on the oral cavity. The purpose of this investigation was to study the prevalence of HPV in oral cavi...

    Authors: Luis O Sánchez-Vargas, Cecilia Díaz-Hernández and Alejandro Martinez-Martinez
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5:25
  6. Concerns have been raised that the proportion of cervical cancer preventable by human papillomavirus (HPV) 16/18 vaccines might be lower in sub-Saharan Africa than elsewhere.

    Authors: Clement Okolo, Silvia Franceschi, Isaac Adewole, Jaiye O Thomas, Michele Follen, Peter JF Snijders, Chris JLM Meijer and Gary M Clifford
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5:24
  7. Ecologic and in vitro studies suggest that exposures to plants or soil may influence risk of Kaposi sarcoma (KS).

    Authors: James J Goedert, Giuseppe Calamusa, Carmelo Dazzi, Anna Perna, Colleen Pelser, Lesley A Anderson, Camille Madsen, Liliana R Preiss, Matt Airola, Barry I Graubard, Angelo Messina, Carmela Lauria and Nino Romano
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5:23
  8. Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, also called Human herpesvirus 8 or HHV8) is a γ-2 herpesvirus that causes Kaposi sarcoma. KSHV seroprevalence rates vary geographically with variable rates recorded...

    Authors: Mercy Guech-Ongey, Murielle Verboom, Ruth M Pfeiffer, Thomas F Schulz, Christopher M Ndugwa, Anchilla M Owor, Paul M Bakaki, Kishor Bhatia, Constança Figueiredo, Britta Eiz-Vesper, Rainer Blasczyk and Sam M Mbulaiteye
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5:21
  9. Although human papillomavirus (HPV) genome has been detected in lung cancer, its prevalence is highly variable around the world. Higher frequencies have been reported in far-east Asian countries, when compared...

    Authors: Francisco Aguayo, Muhammad Anwar, Chihaya Koriyama, Andres Castillo, Quanfu Sun, Jacob Morewaya, Yoshito Eizuru and Suminori Akiba
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5:20
  10. HPV infection in the genital tract is common in young sexually active individuals, the majority of whom clear the infection without overt clinical disease. However most of those who develop benign lesions even...

    Authors: Margaret Stanley
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5:19
  11. To clarify the immunological alterations leading to classical Kaposi sarcoma (cKS) among people infected with KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV).

    Authors: Colleen Pelser, Jaap Middeldorp, Sam M Mbulaiteye, Carmela Lauria, Angelo Messina, Enza Viviano, Nino Romano, Francesco Vitale and James J Goedert
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5:18
  12. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for development of anal squamous cell carcinoma. Despite over 100 genotypes of the virus, HPV 16 and 18 are considered pathogenic as they are se...

    Authors: Sonia Ramamoorthy, Yu-Tsueng Liu, Linda Luo, Katsumi Miyai, Qing Lu and John M Carethers
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5:17
  13. Authors: Doreen Ramogola-Masire, Nicola M Zetola, Veronica de Klerk, Barati Monare, Bakgaki Ratshaa, Gracious Ditlhabang, Elisabeth Chibaya, Metlha Nchunga, Mukendi K Kayembe, Kurt T Barnhart, Cindy M McGrath and Harvey M Friedman
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5(Suppl 1):A83

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 5 Supplement 1

  14. Authors: Nikolay A Belyakov, Zinaida M Zagdyn, Vadim V Rassochin, Tatyana N Trofimova, Alexey Y Kovelenov, Robert Dubrow and Robert Heimer
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5(Suppl 1):A52

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 5 Supplement 1

  15. Authors: Peter D Burbelo, Alexandra T Issa, Kathryn H Ching, Kathleen M Wyvill, Richard F Little, Michael J Iadarola, Joseph A Kovacs and Robert Yarchoan
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5(Suppl 1):A20

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 5 Supplement 1

  16. Authors: Pavel Nikitin, Chris Yan, Eleonora Forte, Alessio Bocedi, Jay Tourigny, Amee Patel, Sandeep Dave, Katherine Hu, Jing Guo, David Tainter, Olena Rusyn and Micah Luftig
    Citation: Infectious Agents and Cancer 2010 5(Suppl 1):A4

    This article is part of a Supplement: Volume 5 Supplement 1

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